Saturday, July 15, 2006

Smart Puffs

Did you know that you can buy (dry goods) groceries on Amazon.com? Right now if you spend $49 you save $10. The free shipping works. For my lunch items, I'll end up saving money.



It's not this item I'm suggesting people buy for their lunches, but check out the packaging concept. It made me smile because of this... Which is some fun I had last October.



Well... okay... so the name "smart puffs" made me smile too. I think I need some of them after all.

The Kids Are Here

My nephews are in town. They’ve been here for just over 24 hours and I’m already pooped. LOL. We went to the arcade and I spent all night chasing after them. There was a teen dance doing on one room off to the side and I could see in there and lots of teens were wall-flowering around the edges (I am so glad that part of my youth is over with) and when we’d walk by the music would inspire my youngest nephew to hip-hop like only a six-year-old can. Three of my coworkers were working at the ticket booth for the sponsoring radio station and I pointed the nephew out... “he could teach some of those kids in there a few moves”.

I should hit the sack because tomorrow the plan is head to the river with the inner tubes. Last year I recall blogging about my experiences and how if any of my heroines display kick-butt tendencies they didn’t inherit the traits from me. I didn’t give up totally though. This year we’ve scoped out an area of the river with tiny rapids (not pictured below).



This is actually from New Year's Day this year when the Truckee River flooded. (Had to get this pics out to show the nephews so I had them handy.) The submerged trees are on an island that normally separates two small channels. The rapids in the foreground were rolling up to five feet over the rest of the river. So even though the river was about two feet from overflowing the sidewalks, if I would have lay down those rapids would have been higher than my vantage point. It was fascinating how the momentum of the water flow kept the water from spilling over the banks ... at this point. A few hours earlier the water had overflowed this bridge (picture below on a typical winter day).